Thursday, 30 November 2017

Review: Yellowman, Young Vic

"Don't marry nothing dark"

As part of winning the Genesis Award, a programme supporting creatives in the "early stages of their professional lives", the Young Vic offers winners the chance to put their talents to work in its smaller places. This year, it is the turn of director Nancy Medina who is mounting a short run of Dael Orlandersmith's 2002 play Yellowman in the intimate space of the Clare, though without an official press night.

It's a brutal but fascinating look at racism within the black community, as Eugene and Alma grow up in 1970s South Carolina, negotiating the difficulties that come from having parents with different skin tones. The darker-skinned Alma is firmly on the wrong side of the tracks whist Eugene, lighter-skinned but derogatorily referred to as 'yellow', has a wealthier family, but one who experiences no less prejudice.

Wednesday, 29 November 2017

Not-a-Review: Bad Roads, Royal Court

"A body without a head in a body bag just doesn’t turn me on"

Was no fan of Natal'ya Vorozhbit's Bad Roads I'm afraid. Plays about war in the Ukraine will perhaps predictably be brutal but the experience of watching it doesn't have to be the same way. Vicky Featherstone's trailblazing at the Royal Court gets her a long way but it's hard not to feel the programming has been decidedly mixed and something of a challenge. Too much, for me, in this case.

Running time: 23rd December
Booking until 95 minutes (without interval)

                     



Tuesday, 28 November 2017

Re-review: Barber Shop Chronicles, National

"It's not about the word, it's the context in which it's used and who uses it"

A much welcome reprise for this extraordinary production of Inua Ellams' Barber Shop Chronicles, a co-production with Fuel & West Yorkshire Playhouse which sold out its initial run at the Dorfman in the summer (here's my review from then) and has already sold out this return engagement which brings back the original cast, ahead of a wee international tour when four new players, David Ajao, Bayo Gbadamosi, Martins Imhangbe and Tuwaine Barrett, will step in for Anthony Welsh, Fisayo Akinade, Hammed Animashaun and Simon Manyonda.

That it is sold out shouldn't stop you from trying to get tickets - there's Friday Rush and there's refreshing this page in case of returns, and boy is it worth it. Bijan Sheibani's production does that magnificent thing of genuinely transforming the theatre into someplace else, someplace special, and the energy that crackles through every single minute of the performance - which starts from the moment you walk into the auditorium, this is definitely a show to be early for - is charged with the significance of these stories being told.

Monday, 27 November 2017

Review: Privates on Parade, Union

"Everyone knows it's the start of the Third World War"

Written in 1977 about events in 1948, there can be a temptation to dismiss the campery and dated gender politics and racial stereotyping of Privates on Parade as outdated and offensive. An argument could be made - and it is one that I have made myself before - that such notions need to be interrogated and challenged by productions. But equally, when the writing is intelligently nuanced and the direction sensitively done, audiences can be left to do this for themselves.

And so it is - I find - with Peter Nichols' play with songs, presented here by Kirk Jameson at the Union. Take the time to delve beneath the surface and you'll soon see there's incisive commentary about the insidious nature of colonialism, about the personal freedoms that can be explored when released from the social strictures of home, about the contemporary lack of opportunities for women, about how war is an equal opportunities offender when it comes to shattering happiness, whether gay or straight. 

Sunday, 26 November 2017

Review: The Importance of Being Earnest, Brockley Jack


"In matters of grave importance, style, not sincerity, is the vital thing"

In some ways, the notion of mounting a production of Oscar Wilde's stalwart comedy The Importance of Being Earnest is a sound one - its effervescent wit remaining evergreen even 120 years after it was written. But equally, the weight of such familiarity - for it is a play that gets consistently put on a lot - means that audiences arrive with certain levels of expectation that can undermine anyone not completely secure in their work.

It's an issue exacerbated that the fact that there's not a huge amount that one can do, or that get done, to productions of Wilde's work - rooted as they are in that specific turn-of-the-century English milieu - to provide the levels of excitement that make them stand out. To wit - its last excursions in the West End relied on a soon-forgotten metatheatrical twist and the stunt casting of David Suchet as Lady Bracknell and neither really succeeded. 

Saturday, 25 November 2017

Review: Trestle, Southwark Playhouse

"We're not here forever. You've got to take a chance from time to time. Sometimes you've got to see something you like and grab hold. Don't let it go."

Unforgivably late, I made it along to Trestle for its final matinee - too late to be able to recommend it to all and sundry but delighted to find it sold out and packed to the rafters in the Southwark Playhouse's Little space. Written by Stewart Pringle, this two-hander is the 2017 Papatango New Writing Prize winner and tacks rather hard away from both Papatango's tendency towards the bleakly dystopian and Pringle's previous output as a writer.

For Trestle is beautifully tender and warm, the kind of play you imagine Victoria Wood heartily approving of as it tracks the burgeoning relationship between Harry and Denise, two retirees struggling to find their place in the world. Their paths cross as their regular bookings at the village hall border onto each other - as his council meetings finish up, her Zumba classes are about to begin and in the moments inbetween, as they share the putting away of tables and chairs, they slowly get to know each other.

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Review: Everybody's Talking About Jamie, Apollo

"Go give the boys boners they won't know what to do with"

When Everybody's Talking About Jamie made its debut in Sheffield earlier this year (here's my review), hopes were high for a transfer, the news of which took a little time to be confirmed, leaving me worried it would suffer the fate of the gorgeous Flowers for Mrs Harris. But this sparkling new show has arrived in the West End and now sits on Shaftesbury Avenue at the Apollo as a proud piece of new British musical theatre and an equally proud piece of LGBT+ storytelling.

Written by Dan Gillespie Sells (music) and Tom MacRae (book and lyric) and adapted from a BBC documentary, Jamie casts off the archetypal coming out and gay bashing stories (though not completely ignoring them) in favour of a main narrative about an out and proud teen who is insistent that he's going to his high school prom in drag but only belatedly coming to realise that his determination to be fierce has consequences for those who love him.

Monday, 20 November 2017

Review: Klein Zielen, Stadschouwberg Amsterdam

“En de ziel begreep dat dat kleine stukje genoeg was”

Completing a trilogy of Louis Couperus adaptations for Toneelgroep Amsterdam, Klein Zielen (Small Souls) is the kind of magisterial theatre on which reputations - such as Ivo van Hove's - are sustained. Couperus is a Dutch writer with a kind of Rattigan-like status as his work is revived here and Klein Zielen is no exception, a study of a family living under the same roof but shattered by the neuroses and traumas of the past that haunt every moment of their existence. 

This is about as lo-fi as van Hove gets, just the one video insert betraying any technological leanings, recalling the stark intensity of A View From The Bridge. And here again, you see the razor precision that he instils in his company and the way they relate to each other, interact with each other. As they each move around the wide open space of the Rabozaal carpeted in a ginormous rug, so much is said about their relationships in the juxtapositions they create.

Review: Uit het leven van marionetten, Rotterdamse Schouwburg

"In de stilte hoor je de waarheid"

In the name of maximising my time in the Netherlands, I've seen a fair few productions in Dutch without any linguistic assistance. Thursday night shows at the Stadschouwberg Amsterdam are regularly surtitled in English but I always want to see more. In the case of plays like Blood Wedding and The Maids, I've been able to get away with since I know them; with others, like A Bride in the Morning, it's been more of a challenge. 

And so it was with Uit het leven van marionetten (From the life of the marionettes), the fifth Ingmar Bergman adaptation from Toneelgroep Amsterdam, helmed by film director Nanouk Leopold in her stage debut. I'd hoped to watch the film in advance but I couldn't track it down in time and so went into the Schouwburg in Rotterdam armed with just a flimsy synopsis and an overwhelming admiration for a company that included the rather fab Eelco Smits.

The 2017 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards

The nominations for the 2017 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards have been released and naturally I have thoughts. Initially, they are:


Review: Tiger Bay, Wales Millennium Centre

"

Rather fittingly, my first ever visit to the magnificent feat of civil engineering that is Cardiff's Wales Millennium Centre was for new musical Tiger Bay (Y Sioe Gerdd). And not just any musical, one based in and on the very area where it is playing, the docklands of Tiger Bay at the turn of the century, when the industrial revolution sent shudders through every level of society. Socio-political unrest not being known for getting the crowds in though, book-writer Michael Williams has fashioned a multi-stranded narrative with truly epic ambitions.

So there's coal men fighting to improve working conditions, African immigrant labour complicating the picture by undercutting them, racism emerging as an ugly thorn, child labour being abused, suffragettes agitating for the vote, and the richest man in the world (the Third Marquess of Bute) who has turned to crystal balls to try and find his missing son. What emerges is a prototype vision for a multicultural society in all its myriad complexities and inequalities, connected in an all-too-human way by circumstance and some stonking great choruses.

Sunday, 19 November 2017

Review: Inside Pussy Riot, Saatchi Gallery

"Failure to do this will result in your fellow inmates being punished"

How far can immersive theatre push you? How far should immersive theatre push you? The disclaimer for Les Enfants Terribles’ Inside Pussy Riot warns us it is "not for the faint hearted, come prepared to demonstrate and stand up for what you believe in!". But given that it is trying to give audiences a taste of what it is like to be on the wrong side of a totalitarian regime, from arrest to trial to incarceration with a bit of forced labour in there for good measure, there's a limit to how far they can actually go.

Marking the 100th annversary of the Russian Revolution, Inside Pussy Riot revisits the experience of Nadya Tolokonnikova and her post punk, feminist art collective colleagues in Pussy Riot, who were convicted and sentenced to two years imprisonment for performing less than 40 seconds of an anti-Putin song in a Moscow cathedral. From the opening moments when you're invited to pick a balaclava (a range of colours available) to the climactic encouragement to raise your voice in protest, there's quite the journey ahead.

Review: The End of History, Tristan Bates

"Sod the League of Nations"

At the heart of it, Iain Hollingshead (book and lyrics) and Timothy Muller's (music) new musical The End of History has an interesting conceit - exploring the history of the 20th century (at least, from 1919 to 1989) through the experiences of a GCSE history class over the two years of their course. Moody teenagers as zealous nation states, geopolitical relations as schoolyard battles, there's potential here. 

It is potential that isn't quite realised though, due to the huge scale of the ambition here. There's the individual stories of 7 students each with their own individual struggles competing for room alongside the historical parallels being drawn at key moments, plus their teacher keeps stepping into the spotlight to pull focus with her own trials and general dissatisfaction at being a teacher to disinterested kids.

Wednesday, 15 November 2017

Album Review: Leading Ladies - Songs From The Stage

"Lock the door and stop complaining
Gather 'round and listen well"


Between them, Amber Riley, Beverley Knight and Cassidy Janson have racked up Olivier Awards and accolades aplenty and their mutual respect has led to them joining forces to create musical supergroup Leading Ladies. And working with producers Brian Rawling and Paul Meehan through East West Records (Warner), their debut album Songs From The Stage is about to be released.

Across the 14 tracks of the collection, there's a variety of approaches as they tackle songs from a wide range of musicals. Each singer gets a couple of solo numbers, and they all chip in with backing vocals on some of those, but the highlights come when the trio sing together. And none more so than on an utterly transcendent version of Carole King's 'Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow' whose close harmonies are goosebump-inducingly extraordinary, the marriage of their voices a perfect alchemy.

Album Review: Helen Power - Enraptured

"There is joy in the air
So be gone with dull care"

What to do to make your album stand out in a crowded marketplace of musical theatre-related albums? Get Auburn Jam's Joe Davison in to do your arrangements, that's what. A glimpse at the tracklisting of Helen Power's new album Enraptured may not initially suggest a great adventurousness but on first listen, its playful and subtly daring nature soon become apparent.

A relaxed take on Porgy & Bess' Summertime is a strong opener, full of bold musicality and Power's confident soprano, but it's the next of couple of tracks that set out the vision here. A Latin-inflected 'The Sound Of Music' has no right to be effective but as Davison introduces silky bossanova rhythms and elastic double-bass lines, it's impossible to resist its easygoing charm. And if less radical, his Bond-esque re-arrangement of the title track from The Phantom Of The Opera is no less exciting, its duelling brass section and violins building to a breathless climax that thrills just as much as Power's soaring top E.

Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Review: Drip, Bush

"Dive, dive, dive right in
Dive, dive, dive, dive, dive right in..."

On the one hand, I think I'd like to see Tom Wells really surprise us with something completely different. But on the other, he does what he does so bloody well that I kinda never want him to stop. Drip sees him playing with form, as it is a one-man musical but thematically, we're once again in the world he has explored so affectingly in plays such as Me As A Penguin, The Kitchen Sink and Jumpers for Goalposts

Our protagonist is Liam, a 15 year old from South Shields who has moved to Hull cos his mum is seeing a guy named Barry who lives there. Making fast friends with Caz, the 'other queer student' at school, he throws himself into helping her with the annual project prize presentation that she is so desperate to win. Only thing is, she's planning Hull's first synchronised swimming team and Liam can't swim... 

Monday, 13 November 2017

Review: Network, National Theatre

"I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore"

With Network, Lee Hall's adaptation of Paddy Chayefsky's 1976 film, Ivo van Hove re-asserts his place as one of the premier theatremakers working, anywhere. A satire that managed to predict just how powerful a tool populist anger can be when leveraged effectively, it is transformed into the immersive bustle of a TV studio, that of UBS Evening News where old hack Howard Beale - a transcendent performance by Bryan Cranston - has been handed his notice. Though initially appearing to accept it with good grace, he causes an almighty media stir when he declares, on air, that he's going to kill himself, triggering a most unlikely rebirth as a truth-spilling 'prophet'. 

And as ever, van Hove and designer Jan Versweyveld challenge our notions of theatrical space and how it is used. An onstage restaurant puts (some) audience members right in the thick of the action, the fourth wall gets well and truly shattered, and the use of live video and big screens forces us into the role of active observers - as Beale goes live on air, do you watch Cranston himself, do you watch him onscreen, do you watch the team observing him from the producers' box...the multiplicity of perspectives reminds us how easy it is to manipulate media, how there can always be other sides to the story. 

The Barricade Boys announce a Christmas Cabaret season with an amazing guest cast

As Mrs Merton might have asked, what first attracted you to musical theatre supergroup The Barricade Boys...?

Clearly, it was their cumulative musical talent - between them, Scott Garnham, Simon Schofield, Craig Mather and Kieran Brown have racked up credits in pretty much every major musical from The Phantom of The Opera, Wicked and Billy Elliot to Jersey Boys, The Sound Of Music and Les Misérables. And now they're bringing their cabaret show to The Other Palace's Studio for a Christmas season which is enough to bring festive cheer to even the most Scrooge-like of hearts.

But not content with filling our stockings thus, they've gone through their contact lists to find a frankly astonishing array of guest stars to accompany them across the entire run, making it nigh-on impossible to choose just one night to go along.

Guest list for The Barricade Boys Christmas Cabaret continued

Thursday, 9 November 2017

Review: No Place Like Hope, Old Red Lion

"Remember, hope is a good thing. 
Maybe the best of things. 
And no good thing ever dies"

On a night when the big West End opening of the evening is an absolute testosterone-fest, it is rather gratifying to see people actually doing something about it, to try and start to redress the balance in their own way. Producer Holly Donovan is one such shining light, using her own negative experiences of gender bias to act as an impetus to finding a play that passed the Bechdel Test and then building a production around it that uses an all-female creative team.

Callum McGowan's No Place Like Hope is that play and what a delicately moving thing it is, depicting an unlikely friendship between two women reeling from the tragedy that life has thrown at them. Becca is a troubled young woman who is carrying out her community service at a hospice and Anna is a cancer patient there and from inauspicious beginnings, a kinship is recognised as they each find in the other something to cling onto, something that might alleviate their despair.

Review: Glengarry Glen Ross, Playhouse

"We're a dying breed"

Obviously, the choice to stage David Mamet's ode to toxic masculinity Glengarry Glen Ross was made long before the hashtag #MeToo shattered the blinkers of anyone unaware of what men have been getting away with. But it feels indicative of a theatrical culture that has reflected and reinforced a societal imbalance - all-male plays, written by men, directed by men, lauded by prize ceremonies and thus easy targets (and safer bets) for revivals, a self-perpetuating loop that doesn't seem to even be coming close to stopping. 

And why should it, one might argue. Sam Yates' production is astutely cast and tightly wound as it visits the world of Chicago real estate. Firstly through a set of short duologues in a Chinese restaurant in which we variously meet a set of salesmen and discover their place in the pecking order. And then after the interval, they're all brought together in their office (an impressive almighty set change from Chiara Stephenson) which has been broken into and where all the frustrations and feelings they've been bottling up now come tumbling free. 

Wednesday, 8 November 2017

Review: Contractions, ND2

"We have a duty of care to all our employees"

I may not be a Deaf Critic but I am a critic who is partially deaf, a state of affairs positions me rather uniquely when it comes to appreciating Deafinitely Theatre's latest production - a bilingual version of Mike Bartlett's 2008 two-hander Contractions. Bilingual as a matter of course, as all of Deafinitely's productions are in using British Sign Language and English but bilingual too as a provocation, in that director Paula Garfield uses neither language continuously.

So as we sit through a series of business meetings between a brutally officious manager (who signs) and corporate wannabe Emma (who both speaks and signs), there's an ingenious sense of dislocation, of delayed and incomplete comprehension, which is as incisive a theatrical representation of what it is like to be deaf in a hearing world as I could ever imagine. And it is a fascinating way to portray the brutal acuity that typifies much of Bartlett's small-scale plays and their sharp dialogue.

Tuesday, 7 November 2017

Album Review: Michael Ball and Alfie Boe - Together Again

"I hang suspended
Until I know
There's a chance that you care"


It is no secret that I am no great fan of a booming tenor and so it was little surprise that Michael Ball and Alfie Boe's album Together was not really my cup of tea. But it was however what many other people wanted and following its success and reaching number 1 in the charts, the pair have collaborated again to produce the imaginatively titled Together Again. And in the spirit of open-mindedness, plus the acknowledgement that there's a more adventurous tracklisting, I steeled myself to listen.

I have to hold up my hands and say I was pleasantly surprised by more than a few of the songs here. The first two-thirds of 'The Rose' are genuinely spine-tinglingly lovely and even when the bombast kicks in for the finale, it stills maintains a heartfelt sincerity. A stroll through 'White Christmas' is marvellously restrained and all the more effective for it. Even the big band swing through 'Bring Me Sunshine' has a gentleness to it that allows both men to demonstrate their performative range.

Monday, 6 November 2017

Cast for the West End transfer of Girl From The North Country announced


Conor McPherson's Girl From The North Country was an absolutely glorious thing at the Old Vic this summer and I'm pleased to see that its relatively slow-burning success has translated into a West End transfer. It is also gratifying to see that many of the original cast of this Bob Dylan musical (or play with songs if you're precious like that) are remaining with the production, especially Shirley Henderson and Sheila Atim, who I suspect we should be looking out for come awards season.

Sunday, 5 November 2017

Album Review: Sheridan Smith - Sheridan

"Feels like we could go on for forever this way"

Over the past decade, Sheridan Smith has established herself as one of the UK's finest actresses. From comedies such as The Royle Family, Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps and Gavin & Stacey, she has graduated to BAFTA-winning success in Mrs Biggs, Cilla and this year's exceptional The Moorside. And onstage, she's a 4-time Olivier Award nominee and 2-time winner, being recognised for her work in both plays - Flare Path - and musicals - Legally Blonde. Now she has the music world in her sights as she releases her debut album Sheridan.

There's returns to the material that has justly made her reputation. Her impassioned take on Cilla Black's swinging 'Anyone Who Had a Heart' remains an absolute joy and a full-throated rendition of Funny Girl's 'My Man' recalls the energy of her Fanny Brice. It feels she is most at home in the torch song arena though, and whether in the oldies (Timi Yuro's 'Hurt', The Carpenters' 'Superstar') or newer tracks (Rufus Wainwright's 'Dinner at Eight'), the tone of her lower register glows with charismatic warmth. With producer Tris Penna and co-producer, arranger and musical director Steve Sidwell, there's a real appreciation for the collation of music that suits Smith and really does create a harmonious whole.

Saturday, 4 November 2017

Scott Alan announces Live at Zédel residency with special guests in 2018

Live At Zédel, Soho’s unique live entertainment concept at The Crazy Coqs, will host a week-long residency by acclaimed international songwriter Scott Alan, who will be joined by a host of special musical theatre guests each evening. Audiences will be treated to Scott, along with his special guests singing tunes from all 7 of his recordings and brand new songs from his upcoming release, Lifeline.

The schedule for the special guests joining Scott Alan is:
Sunday, January 28th - Alice Fearn, Sophie Evans and Bradley Jaden
Monday, January 29th - Matt Henry and Amy Lennox
Wednesday, January 31st - Tyrone Huntley, Kayleigh McKnight and Tim Newman
Thursday, February 1st - Natasha Barnes, Shanay Holmes, Jodie Steele, Shona White and Emma Williams.
Sunday, February 4th - Marisha Wallace, Asmeret Ghebremichael and Joe Aaron Reid

Scott Alan says: 
“I’m honoured to have been asked to return for another residency at Zedel. Taking the stage at this beautifully, intimate venue is the perfect way to celebrate a brand new year and teaming up with some of the biggest names in the London theatre scene is just icing on the cake!”
Sunday, January 28th, 2018 at 7pm
Special guests include Wicked trio Alice Fearn, Sophie Evans and Bradley Jaden

Monday, January 29th, 2018 at 7pm
Special guests include Olivier Winning Actor Matt Henry (Kinky Boots), Olivier nominated actress Amy Lennox, who earned rave reviews for her role as Lauren in the original West End cast of Kinky Boots

Wednesday, January 31st, 2018 at 7pm 
Special guests include Olivier Nominated Actor Tyrone Huntley (Jesus Christ Superstar), Tim Newman (Memphis) and Kayleigh McKnight (Les Misérables), whom Huntley recently appeared with in the Regent Park Open Air Theatre production of Jesus Christ Superstar.

Thursday, February 1st, 2018 at 7pm 
“It’s Ladies Night” and special guests including Natasha Barnes (Funny Girl), Shanay Holmes (Rent), Jodie Steele (Wicked), Shona White (Mamma Mia!) and Emma Williams (Half a Sixpence).

February 4th, 2018 at 9pm
Special guests include Dreamgirls star Marisha Wallace along with her co-stars Joe Aaron Reid (Curtis Taylor Jr.) and Asmeret Ghebremichael (Lorrell Robinson). 

For full information on each evening and to book tickets please visit www.liveatzedel.com

Friday, 3 November 2017

Too-late-to-review: Wings, Young Vic

Slipping in just before it finished in a week when I have no time, you'll have to look elsewhere for reviews of Wings, and Juliet Stevenson's excellent performance therein.

Thursday, 2 November 2017

Review: Nativity! The Musical, Birmingham Rep

"A cheeky drink, a naughty wink,
we'll loosen up alright"

Just like a wise man, I came late to Nativity, only getting round to watching Debbie Isitt's film a couple of years ago but oh, how it won me over, feeling like an instant Christmas classic. (The less said about the sequel and the shocking third film, the better). So it was little surprise to hear that Isitt was adapting her film for the stage, in the form of Nativity! The Musical. And though I have once again embraced my inner Scrooge and won't be reviewing much, if any, festive fare this year, I couldn't resist the chance to sparkle and shine.

And I'm glad I did, even if it is a full month too early to be even thinking of anything Christmassy. Nativity remains a beautifully heart-warming story and if anything, has even more of a feel-good factor about it through all the liveness of this production. The story centres on Coventry primary school St Bernadette's, trying to escape Ofsted-imposed special measures by beating a rival school to putting on the best Christmas show which, through the most tenuous of links, might just attract Hollywood interest and get turned into a film.

Review: Heisenberg - The Uncertainty Principle, Wyndham's

"Why are you still talking to me?"

As a vehicle to launch the new producing venture, Elliott & Harper Productions, Heisenberg: The Uncertainty Principle is an odd thing. A new play by Simon Stephens and directed by Marianne Elliott, it's a piece of writing that feels caught in the wrong moment as the outpouring of revelations around sexual harassment (and worse) threaten a tectonic shift in gender relationships and, hopefully, the way they are portrayed in our culture.

Thus it feels hard to accept a retread of the May-to-December trope, weighted in favour of the older man getting a younger woman natch, and the re-emergence of the manic pixie dream girl in lieu of the more nuanced character hinted at beneath the eccentric trappings. There's no subversion of expectation as a rather predictable plot winds through its 90 minutes and the suggestion of quantum physics informing the play feels more like window-dressing compared to the structural ingenuity of say Copenhagen or the chaos theory-influenced Constellations.

Wednesday, 1 November 2017

Review: The Trap, Omnibus

"The predictability of human desperation is incredible"

Set over a long night of the soul for the employees of a payday loans company, Kieran Lynn's play The Trap is described as "a biting new comedy". And for once, it does actually provide a fair few laughs, of the decidedly darkly comic sort, as it simultaneously shines an uncompromising light on the seedier end of capitalist society - the market for short-term loans and the predatory way in which the most-in-need are tempted in.

We open with Tom and Clem breaking into an office to steal money from a safe there, and it soon turns out that they are disgruntled employees trying to pull a fast one. But Lynn's trick is to show how the perils of debt stretch far and wide and so they are eventually joined by branch manager Alan (gambling addict) and regional manager Meryl (mortgaged to the hilt) who are also searching for an quick route to assuage their financial woes.